Fota Frameyard Blog

Gardening, Nature and Heritage from Fota House


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Pride of the Glasshouse

In Glasshouse 6 in the Victorian Working Garden at Fota, the Echium candicans, pride of Madeira is thriving. Standing beside it is like listening to an orchestra of strings, as the bees visit  this bee-friendly plant all day long.

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Laying out the gardens at Fota

A new exhibition has opened in the Victorian Working Garden at Fota House, on the life of William Beswick, Head Gardener, 1901-1915. Gathering information for the exhibition has been a fascinating journey and Catherine and I have enjoyed every minute of the research.  We have discovered some very interesting and relevant information that we thought we would share with you to compliment the opening of this exhibition.

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A short but fruitful life

“How sweet a preparation of the medium of life is a kind friend’s letter”  Ellen Hutchins

Ellen Hutchins family recently found a bundle of 50 letters written by her to other members of her family. These letters and the many hundreds of others written by her to her mentors and fellow plant enthusiasts, bring to life her passion for all things natural.  Letters were important to Ellen Hutchins, as her own ill-health and the duties of caring for her elderly mother and disabled brother meant that she rarely travelled outside of Bantry Bay. Despite this confinement, it could be said that she took “the road less travelled” because she was a pioneer and Ireland’s first female botanist. 

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A Major Star in the garden

Astrantia major has many common names – Hattie’s pincushion, great masterwort and even melancholy gentleman. One of our volunteers, Sally, remembers it being called “Granny’s Brooch”, due to its resemblance to a piece of old-fashioned jewellery, the kind  that an elderly relative might have worn on the lapel of a ‘good coat’ on special occasions. Astrantia, which have been cultivated since the C16th, was described by William Robinson as having ‘a quaint beauty of their own’.

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Small and unpretending

The delicate blue flowers of Forget-Me-Not are holding their own among the strong, wiry stalks of Sweet William in Glasshouse No. 5. Both species (Myosotis scorpiodes and Dianthus barbatus) fit well into our Victorian setting. Much has been written about the symbolism of Forget-Me-Not, stretching back to Medieval times. It is associated with King Henry IV who is said to have adopted the flower as his symbol while in exile from England in 1398. 

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